3 ft Safe Passing Law

What is “3’ Safe Passing”?

3’ Safe Passing is now the standard in 27 states. This law establishes that motorists must give bicyclists three feet of space between the bicycle and a vehicle on the road. Presently, New York State leads the nation in bicycle and pedestrian crashes, and this law will help change that paradigm through expanded education and other efforts with partners around the state.

Earlier this year, NYBC surveyed the NYS bicycling community, the result of which was that the majority of respondents indicated that 3’ Safe Passing is their top legislative priority.

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How to make 3’ Safe Passing a reality in NYS:

  1. Write to Assemblyman Gantt, Chairman of Assembly Transportation Committee, requesting that he allow a vote on the bill during the upcoming legislative session, along with Assemblyman Phil Steck and Sen. Tom O’Mara, who sponsored the bill in past sessions, to encourage them to co-sponsor the bill again this year.
  2. Plan a 3’ Safe Passing ride. Your local bike club can Ride for Advocacy wearing our 3’ Safe Passing jerseys (special pricing available)!
  3. Contact your local state representatives. Reach out to your senator or assemblymember by email, postal mail, or social media to express your support for the 3’ Safe Passing Bill. Find representatives here.
  4. Be part of our network! Individuals and organizations who are interested in bicycle/pedestrian issues, environmental sustainability, disability rights, safety, seniors, and others all have a stake in helping to pass this legislation! Help us grow our network by encouraging your local groups to sign on to this effort.
  5. Sign the petition. Your voice matters! Show that you care by signing the petition here.
  6. Every bit counts. To make a targeted donation to the NYBC 3’ Safe Passing campaign, please click here.

 

Download this page as a shareable one-sheet by clicking here: 2018 3′ Safe Passing Campaign One Sheet Final

History of 3 ft Passing Law Efforts 2016-17

New York ranks 29th in bike crash statistics. See how NYBC is trying to change this paradigm.